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MICRO-NETWORKS

Two-way electrical generation systems that distribute electricity from suppliers to consumers using digital technology and fostering the integration of renewable generation sources in order to save energy, reduce costs and increase reliability.

Generation

  • Energy Resource
    • Solar Power Panels (Renewable)
    • Mini-generators or wind generators (Renewable)
    • Micro-turbines (Renewable)
    • Fuel cells
  • Controllable or Intermittent (Operating Mode)
  • Primary Energy Resource
  • Interface based on power electronics

Storage

  • Electro-Thermal
  • Thermal storage cells
  • Inertia flywheels
  • Ultra-capacity ...

Loads

  • Electrical-Thermal
  • Supply quality (critical loads, industrial processes)
  • Controllable or Non-controllable

Switches

  • Power grid connection point

Protective elements

  • Connected-Isolated-Connected transitions (island status detection)
  • Short-circuit voltages for fault/failure detection

Control Systems

  • Micro-network Central Control Systems (BEEMS)
  • Local Controllers (generators, controllers, loads)
  • Communications (Distribution Operator, local)
  • Control logic distribution (primary control, secondary regulation, auxiliary services)
  • Higher quality supply, greater savings and less dependence on the distribution grid.
  • Can work connected to the public distribution grid or isolated from it.
  • Greater energy efficiency due to the closeness to the generation sources and the use of the energy and heat from the systems
  • The public grid also benefits from these micro-networks as they support its operation in the event of a failure
  • They use less energy than today’s centralised generation and distribution systems
  • They reduce greenhouse gas emissions and boost the use of renewable energies
  • Consumers who do not directly benefit from micro-networks may also benefit from these systems This is because an increased use of micro-networks would mean lower energy costs due to the drop in peak demand on the distribution grid
  • Optimised economic benefits all while maintaining the proper level of user comfort
  • Enhanced use of renewable sources
  • Increased reliability and supply security
  • Service quality (reactive and voltage control) as per the user’s requirements
  • Capacity to reduce consumption peaks
  • Consumers who do not directly benefit from micro-networks may also benefit from these systems This is because an increased use of micro-networks would mean lower energy costs due to the drop in peak demand on the distribution grid
  • Continuous Generation: Generate electrical energy continuously, operating in parallel with the distribution network. (Wind farms ...)
  • Isolated generation (isolated systems, microregions)
  • Energy storage: It is considered viable when the cost of the technology to be used is compensated with the energy gain, interruptions are frequent or there are renewable energy sources